Dating an ironman triathlete

17-Oct-2016 09:13

These are the men and women at the sidelines rallying and cheering for them.Here’s a list of the benefits and drawbacks of dating or being married to a triathlete straight from a real life Tri Yaya/Iron Yaya: 1.There are two categories, professional and amateur.Amateurs which mostly make up most of the participants are also referred as “age groupers” as they compete and classified further based on sex and age.And then you don’t have to always be his training partner or his coach, though you can be both sometimes, because he has other people for that.Instead, you can just be in a normal healthy relationship that includes two triathletes.

dating an ironman triathlete-62

The presumption here is that normal healthy couples don’t spend hours training. What is it that all these so-called normal couples do with their free weekends that’s supposed to be so great? Not to get all mushy for a second, but: You should be able to support and accommodate each other, at least you should be able to if you’re both reasonable human beings.In the second installment of Ask a Random Triathlete, we’re answering that perpetual and ever-frustrating question of how to workout with and accommodate a triathlete significant other, as opposed to the even more vexing non-triathlete significant other.(Read the first Ask a Random Triathlete installment here.) As your resident Random Triathlete, I felt this was a good opportunity to talk about myself, since I’m pretty sure I’m amazing.Despite that whole ‘how triathlon couples make it work’ story that was making the rounds a few weeks ago and its many variations that have been written through the yearly publication cycles, I’m not 100% sure that just because your significant other can ride a bike means that you to ride bikes together. How ripe that is for disaster probably depends on you and your relationship, but I find it unlikely that the odds are ever zero.Maybe you want to spend time with this new triathlon fling and share in this special bond you both have, etc. Me, I spend enough time with my husband; I can spend some quality workout time by myself.

The presumption here is that normal healthy couples don’t spend hours training. What is it that all these so-called normal couples do with their free weekends that’s supposed to be so great? Not to get all mushy for a second, but: You should be able to support and accommodate each other, at least you should be able to if you’re both reasonable human beings.

In the second installment of Ask a Random Triathlete, we’re answering that perpetual and ever-frustrating question of how to workout with and accommodate a triathlete significant other, as opposed to the even more vexing non-triathlete significant other.

(Read the first Ask a Random Triathlete installment here.) As your resident Random Triathlete, I felt this was a good opportunity to talk about myself, since I’m pretty sure I’m amazing.

Despite that whole ‘how triathlon couples make it work’ story that was making the rounds a few weeks ago and its many variations that have been written through the yearly publication cycles, I’m not 100% sure that just because your significant other can ride a bike means that you to ride bikes together. How ripe that is for disaster probably depends on you and your relationship, but I find it unlikely that the odds are ever zero.

Maybe you want to spend time with this new triathlon fling and share in this special bond you both have, etc. Me, I spend enough time with my husband; I can spend some quality workout time by myself.

If you choose to do some of your training together, there are general rules that it seems everyone adheres to (though also it seems triathlon divorces are common, so what does everyone know anyway): The key to all this is knowing which of you is the faster one.