Dutch reformed dating

23-Jun-2016 05:55

By the time of the Revolution, there were over 100 Dutch reformed congregations.They had been so well treated and assimilated by the British, in fact, that perhaps one-third were loyal to the nation which had defeated them a century earlier.Since several NRC churches began independently and then joined the denomination, the below list of congregations by date of organization does not correspond to date of affiliation with the NRC.(If someone can provide such information, I will gladly add it.) The Heritage Reformed denomination has published a helpful, informative history on its website, which is also the history of the NRC through 1993.Unlike Dutch Catholics, Dutch Calvinists tended not to assimilate readily into existing denominations. Even without government policies to encourage emigration, the exodus began.The first Canadian Christian Reformed congregation was organized at Nyverdall, Alberta, in 1905; another was begun in Winnipeg in 1908. This increased in 1949 when new emigration policies were announced, including subsidies to people "deemed as economic surplus." Dutch immigration to North America had slowed significantly by the early-1960s, as shown in Figure 1.

The second involved immigrant congregations in Michigan; after joining the RCA in 1850, four of these congregations left the fold in 1857 and began the Christian Reformed Church.Immigration slowed during the Depression and nearly stopped during World War II. The Great Depression, two world wars in a generation, and the threat of communism changed Dutch attitudes on emigration.Immigration statistics show 116 Dutch immigrants (not counting children under 10) entering Canada from 1940 to 1945. Beyond these circumstances shared with the rest of Europe, the Dutch government also had to deal with over 100,000 refugees from Indonesia, overpopulation, a housing shortage, loss of jobs, a reduction in tax revenues, and international currency problems.The first Reformed Church in America congregation in Canada was formed at Monarch, Alberta, in 1909. Nowhere in Europe did people suffer more for what they believed than they did in Holland.Although the reformed Dutch were not a large minority, there were already signs that they would not surrender their heritage. Spain, the most powerful country of that day, ruled Holland with an iron hand.

The second involved immigrant congregations in Michigan; after joining the RCA in 1850, four of these congregations left the fold in 1857 and began the Christian Reformed Church.

Immigration slowed during the Depression and nearly stopped during World War II. The Great Depression, two world wars in a generation, and the threat of communism changed Dutch attitudes on emigration.

Immigration statistics show 116 Dutch immigrants (not counting children under 10) entering Canada from 1940 to 1945. Beyond these circumstances shared with the rest of Europe, the Dutch government also had to deal with over 100,000 refugees from Indonesia, overpopulation, a housing shortage, loss of jobs, a reduction in tax revenues, and international currency problems.

The first Reformed Church in America congregation in Canada was formed at Monarch, Alberta, in 1909. Nowhere in Europe did people suffer more for what they believed than they did in Holland.

Although the reformed Dutch were not a large minority, there were already signs that they would not surrender their heritage. Spain, the most powerful country of that day, ruled Holland with an iron hand.

Some of these loyalists returned to the Netherlands following the Revolutionary War, while others settled in future Canada, often joining Presbyterian or Anglican churches.