Is carbon dating advisable for measuring the age of

22-Apr-2017 11:54

Warning about fakes using ancient materials What about airport x-rays and radiography? Thus, when one measures dose in pottery, it is the dose accumulated since it was fired, unless there was a subsequent reheating. When pottery is fired, it loses all its previously acquired TL, and on cooling the TL begins again to build up.Using this information often reduces the uncertainty to 15-25 per cent. Nearly any mineral material which has been heated above 500C at a time one wishes to know is a candidate for TL dating. Porcelains, being nearly vitrified, are a special case requiring a fairly large solid core sample, and TL dating of intact objects is not recommended because of the damage caused by sampling.Most porcelain dating is done for insurance purposes on broken objects.Drilling, the usual method of sampling, introduces some uncertainty.It is also rare that any information about the radiation from the burial soil can be obtained, as art objects are usually thoroughly cleaned.

Among the reasons for this is the small amount of material that may be taken for testing.

Some of these are quite easy to detect; some quite difficult.

For example figures, normally modeled, may be carved out of brick or assembled out of fragments.

The age of the pottery, in principle, may then be determined by the relation Age = Accumulated dose / Dose per year Although conceptually straightforward, TL has proven to to be far from simple in practice.

Should I be concerned about artificial irradiation? If the radioactivity of the pottery itself, and its surroundings, is measured, the dose rate, or annual increment of dose, may be computed.

Among the reasons for this is the small amount of material that may be taken for testing.

Some of these are quite easy to detect; some quite difficult.

For example figures, normally modeled, may be carved out of brick or assembled out of fragments.

The age of the pottery, in principle, may then be determined by the relation Age = Accumulated dose / Dose per year Although conceptually straightforward, TL has proven to to be far from simple in practice.

Should I be concerned about artificial irradiation? If the radioactivity of the pottery itself, and its surroundings, is measured, the dose rate, or annual increment of dose, may be computed.

Much stoneware is not so hard as porcelain and may be sampled by drilling.