Legal definition of intimidating

09-Jun-2017 07:05

Never before has a populist democracy attained international supremacy.~ Zbigniew Brzezinski Intimidation (also called cowing) is intentional behavior that would cause a person of ordinary sensibilities fear of injury or harm.Comments: This section of the code was drafted with the intention of being used in labour disputes, although it may have wider application.Some of the language is similar to criminal harassment, with some notable missing elements.Domestic violence and abuse are used for one purpose and one purpose only: to gain and maintain total control over you. Abusers use fear, guilt, shame, and intimidation to wear you down and keep you under his or her thumb.Your abuser may also threaten you, hurt you, or hurt those around you. Threat of harm is defined as, all actions, statements, written or non-verbal messages conveying threats of physical or mental injury which are serious enough to unsettle the child's mind.It includes: expressions of intent to inflict pain, injury, or punishment on the child.~ USLegal Every honest man knows why Trade Unions insist on the right to a strong numerical picket:...

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The most significant federal law banning intimidation is the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which states in Section 11(b) that "No person … any person for voting or attempting to vote." The Voting Rights Act was written in the days of Jim Crow, when African-American voters were often kept from casting their ballots by threats of physical violence or actual physical violence.

As electioneering tactics have grown more subtle, however, courts have had to decide what constitutes voter intimidation on a case-by-case basis.

The suit alleging intimidation by poll watchers in Ohio cited a New Jersey consent decree from 1982 in which the Republican National Committee, without admitting to any unlawful behavior, agreed to stop using so-called "ballot security squads" to check voters' credentials in predominantly black and Latino precincts.

District Judge ruled this morning that Republican poll watchers in South Dakota were intimidating Native American voters by following them out of polling places and taking down their license plate numbers.

The Ohio law, for instance, says that "no person shall …

The most significant federal law banning intimidation is the Voting Rights Act of 1965, which states in Section 11(b) that "No person … any person for voting or attempting to vote." The Voting Rights Act was written in the days of Jim Crow, when African-American voters were often kept from casting their ballots by threats of physical violence or actual physical violence.

As electioneering tactics have grown more subtle, however, courts have had to decide what constitutes voter intimidation on a case-by-case basis.

The suit alleging intimidation by poll watchers in Ohio cited a New Jersey consent decree from 1982 in which the Republican National Committee, without admitting to any unlawful behavior, agreed to stop using so-called "ballot security squads" to check voters' credentials in predominantly black and Latino precincts.

District Judge ruled this morning that Republican poll watchers in South Dakota were intimidating Native American voters by following them out of polling places and taking down their license plate numbers.

The Ohio law, for instance, says that "no person shall …

In his dissent in the Ohio case, 6, in which the Supreme Court found that Tennessee's ban on "the solicitation of votes and the display or distribution of campaign materials" within 100 feet of polling places served the state's "compelling interests in preventing voter intimidation and election fraud." The court, though, did not indicate what kind of intimidation such a buffer zone would protect voters from.